Not-Glass

Once I broke a plate

and glass shattered everywhere.

And by that I mean

that it broke into two pieces –

one large, and one smaller

(a crescent moon and its other). But

 

tiny little particles,

atoms of not-glass that, when combined with other atoms of not-glass, make glass-glass,

took this chance to escape.

They shook themselves off of the

surprisingly clean

edges

and vibrated away into corners and up walls, bouncing against floorboards.

 

 

Once I broke a plate and it cried when it hit the floor.

And by that I mean

that it sounded like lightning posing as thunder,

sharp and loud and booming all at once

and then over.

 

Once

I broke a plate and caused a sand storm.

And by that

I mean that brown rice spilled across the floor,

grain by grain on the grain of the wood

in lost heaps.

 

When you’re little

and you brake a plate

someone comes and tells you to

Stand Still.

while they clean up all of the little landmines

waiting to go off in your foot.

When you grow up

and you brake a plate

(like I did)

you have to clean it up yourself,

so it’s nice when it only brakes into a moon and an other.

(In any case,

all of the not-glass is probably still around

somewhere.)

Magnetic Fields

Magnetic FieldsMildred Thompson 1990, oil on canvas, 70.5 x 150” (triptych)

Magnet: something which can repel or attract. An object which enacts a force. Gravity, pull, push. Order. Field: openness, nature, space. Breath.

Magnetic Fields: tension.

The title object for Magnetic Fields, a large painting by Mildred Thomas, is unabashed. Color and energy force viewing. Look! Look at me! I am red and yellow and sunlight and confetti. I am energy trapped in a medium that will never truly dry. I am heat. Attracting. Come closer – feel it? Look into my vortex and see how light looks to its source. This is a brilliant blanket, hung on a wall, wrapping you up.

Color to color. Red becomes purple. A tornado of dashes becomes a performance on canvas. Graffiti has peeled itself off walls and run away. Movement upon movement – brushstrokes meet squiggles meet loops meet drips that would impress Jack the Dripper himself. Despite the chaos and the frothing noise of the painting – the composition threatening to whirl itself into oblivion (attracting, repelling) – there is an undoubtedly elegant element to the work of art.

Whirlwind Dancer, Shinique Smith, 2014-2017, Acrylic, ink, fabric, and collage on canvas over wood panel, 96 x 96 x 3″ (diptych)

This is what it would look like to give a paint bucket to a ballerina in full costume, and let the paint and the tutu and makeup and the hair accessories and all of the love work itself up into a twirl and a launch and a landing, all with haphazard grace. The canvas can always be trusted to lift and catch its partner.

Pointed and pressured toes lead to feet on fire. Then not a fire, but only whispering embers. Near by a canvas sputters and steams. A bucket of water has been thrown on a neon fire. Multicolored sparks ignore gravity, repelling, and escape into the breath of the viewer, attracting. Ash and light and time are suspended as the paint bleeds and blossoms. Here we have the the definitive record of a dying gasp – systematic and explosive all at once. Study it.

Are you attracted or repelled?

YARDGUARD, Brenna Youngblood, 2015, Mixed media on canvas, 72 × 60″

Downstairs, beneath the push and pull and color of Magnetic Fields, Fanny Sanín’s geometric abstractions are so clean and sharp that you could cut yourself on them.

 

“Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction 1960s to Today” is on view at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington DC until January 21, 2018.

Color, Light, and Clouds: The Art of Thomas Wilfred

Here light is the artist’s sole medium of expression.

He must mould it by optical means,

almost as a sculpture models clay.

He must add color, and finally motion to his creation. 

Motion, the time dimension, demands that he must

be a choreographer in space. 

~Thomas Wilfred

How do you play light? How do you change noise, which is not-matter, into light, which is not-matter, and come away with an experience, which certainly matters?

In the charcoal grey, cave-like gallery space, ghostly, glowing forms draw you toward them. How can a form without mass have such gravity?

Part lava lamp, part screen saver, part soul trapped in a simple frame – the screens are opuses. This one, Counterpoint in Space, Op. 146 is an eternal smokey vapor trapped in a box. It ‘s like watching a sunrise through a puff of vape smoke: sweet and ghostly and just a little off-putting if you get too close. It is an always-shifting, rose-green, meditative viewing experience.

Throughout the exhibition there is a contrast of weightless, noiseless, changing color-forms, with the heavy wooden boxes that ground them, frame them, and ultimately allow them to exist. Here, a cage is a life source.

Track the light, follow the smoke. This is the world of a busy, multitasking mind – a dream-place built by a conductor of light. This is proof that light can be bent and moved and taught to behave, though it remains unburdened by its task.

At first glance there is stillness, then a gentle, bleeding, lazily drifting spread of brightness.

Wilfred believed that imagination was a concept, and that reality was the physical equipment which made it possible. The artist’s role is to make people believe that what they see on screen is actually a window; that the world of light and color and emotion and form captured in brief is all around us.

It’s all about laying back and finding shapes in the clouds.

 

Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light is on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington DC until January 7, 2018.